paypal-donate-horton-cemetery

    Support & Subscribe

    Patrons

    Borough of Epsom and Ewell’s
    
    Freemen
     Michael Arthur
     David Smith
    
    Aldermen
     Jean Smith 
     Michael Staples
     Jean Steer
     Keith Mann
     Robert Lewis
    
    Member of Parliament
     Chris Grayling
    
     Revd. David Fox Branch
     Janice Baker
    
    Polish Institute
      Dr Andrzej Suchcitz

HENNESSEY, Charles

b.1870 – d.1917

Long Grove records show Charles as being buried on 27th November 1917 age 45 – giving a birth date about 1872.

1870s

The only Charles Hennessey I found between 1870 and 1875 was actually registered in the June quarter of 1870 in Camberwell, mother’s maiden name Bryant. This fits well with the 1871 Census record taken on 2nd April, where Edmond and Mary Hennessey are living at 25 Lovegrove Street, St Giles, Camberwell, with their son Charles, aged 10 months. Edmond is a bricklayer’s labourer and both he and his wife were born in Ireland. Charles is recorded as born in Surrey because at this time the Vice County of Surrey extended as far as Southwark.

I have not found a marriage between a Edmond Hennessey and Mary Bryant, but they may have married in Ireland. Several Edward Hennessey’s born about the right time in Ireland but I am unable to identify if one is Charles’ father.

1880s

On Census night – 3rd April 1881 – the family is lodging at 32 Lovegrove Street and have a daughter, Mary A, aged 6. I checked for her birth and found a Mary Hennessey born in the March quarter, 1875 – no second name and mother noted as ‘Bryan’ – but even so I feel this is possibly Charles’ sister as no other mother has a name so similar to ‘Bryant’.

His father is recorded as Edward, but the rest of the family matches with the 1871 details – Edward is still a bricklayer’s labourer and Mary is now working as a charwoman. Charles and Mary are at school.

On 7th October 1881, Westminster Workhouse records a Charles Henessey (sic) found destitute and ill, being discharged to his mother after breakfast. Could this be ‘our’ Charles? Possible but not sure.

In 1884 we find Charles again in the workhouse and on 2nd August discharged ‘to Police’. I cannot find whether he was charged with anything or just released. Again, on 2nd December the same year he is discharged ‘ to police court’. Unfortunately I have not found any details. It might suggest that Charles was at a bit of a loose end so far as work was concerned, though both parents appear to have set an example and been employed.

1890s

The 1891 Census shows Mary Hennessey, now a widow aged 41 and a laundress, with son Charles, 25, and a labourer, and daughter Mary Ann,16, also a laundress, all at 5 Lovegrove Street in Camberwell.

Charles’ age does not quite match – he is actually nearer 21, and Mary senior is nearer to 46 compared with the 1871 Census .

1900s

Constance Road Workhouse records Charles’ admission on 20th May 1908 from Camberwell Parish by order of ‘Milton’ – alleged insane. His occupation is labourer and he is of the Roman Catholic Faith.

On 3rd June 1908, he is discharged with the reason ‘DD expired’. (I have not found what these initials stand for).

Later that year, on 27th November 1908, Charles is once again registered at Constance Road Workhouse having been transferred from ‘GRW’ – a labourer and Roman Catholic.

On December 12th 1908, Charles is discharged from Constance Road Workhouse – where he is recorded as destitute – to Long Grove Asylum.

There are several gaps which we may be able to fill once we have access to more records.


Any redistribution or reproduction of part or all of the contents in any form is prohibited other than the following:
You may print or download to a local storage device extracts for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You may copy the content to individual third parties for their personal use, but only if you acknowledge the website as the source of the material.

You may not, except with our express written permission, distribute or commercially exploit the content. Nor may you transmit it or store it in any other website or other form of electronic retrieval system.

Comments

So empty here ... leave a comment!

Leave a Reply

Sidebar



%d bloggers like this: