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HYATT, George

b.1878-d.1919

George Hyatt’s birth was registered in the March quarter of 1878, (reference Hendon 3a 141). Hendon Registration District covered Willesden.

George was baptised on 6 February 1878 at St. Augustine’s Church, Kilburn. His parents were John, a bricklayer, and Emma. They lived at 121, Pembroke Road. Their name was mis-transcribed as ‘Hiett’.

In the 1881 Census, at 112 Denmark Road Willesden, were John Hyatt, head, age 35, a bricklayer, Emma his wife, age 32, a Servant, and their children. These were John, age 15, a bricklayer, Minnie, age 9, Matilda, age 7, Henry, age 5, George, age 3, and Elizabeth, age 1. Apart from John, all the children were scholars and all were born in London. There were 20 people living in the house.

On 28 June 1886 George was admitted to the Beethoven Street School, Kilburn. He was birth date was given as 18 December 1877. His father was John who lived at 92, Lancefield Road.

In the Census of 1891, at 24 Salusbury Road Willesden were John Hyatt, head, 44, a bricklayer, born Marylebone, Emma, his wife, 42, born Paddington and their children. Matilda was aged 17 and was a servant born in Marylebone. Henry T., aged 15 was born Willesden. George, aged 13 was a scholar born Willesden; his sister, Elizabeth aged 11, was also a scholar born in Willesden; Frederick age 6, a scholar, born Chelsea. There were 19 people living in the house.

Today, the average price of a semi detached house in Salusbury Road is £1.9m.

George Marries

In the June quarter of 1898, George Hyatt married Rose Florence Aldridge (reference Hendon 3a 396).

In the June quarter of 1899, their son George Henry was born (reference Hendon 3a 272).
Unfortunately his death was registered in the September quarter of the same year (reference Hendon 3a 157).

In the 1901 Census, at 78, Lancefield Street Kilburn were George Hyatt, head, aged 24, a bricklayer, born Willesden, and Rose, his wife, aged 23, born Westminster. There were nowb16 people living in the house.

Today the average price for a terraced house in Lancefield Street is £1.2 m.

At 220, Carleton Vale Willesden were John Hyatt, head, age 54, a bricklayer, born Marylebone, Emma, his wife, age 52, born Stratford and Harold J. Hyatt, their grandson, born Stratford.

In 1907, George and Rose Hyatt emigrated to America and settled in New York.

In the 1911 Census, at 220 Carleton Vale, London N.W. living in 3 rooms were John Hyatt, head, aged 64, a bricklayer, born Paddington and Emma, his wife, aged 62. With them was Harold James Hyatt, their grandson, aged 17, an umbrella maker. John and Emma had been married for 46 years. They had 11 children of whom 6 had died.

I could not find a marriage between John Hyatt and an Emma.

To America and Back

On 1 June 1915 the New York State Census was taken. In the Rochester Ward, Monroe, New York, lived George Hyatt, head, aged 37, Rose F., his wife, aged 36, and their children Frederick H., age 4 and Lilian E., age 2.

The S.S. Philadelphia arrived in Liverpool on 5 September 1915 from New York. On board were George Hyatt, a labourer, age 38, Rose F. Hyatt, housewife, 38, and their children George Fred., 5, and Lillian E., age 2. Their proposed address was 220 Carleton Vale, West Kilburn London.

On 14 October 1915, George Hyatt, aged 37, enlisted in the Middlesex Regiment at Mill Hill London. His attestation papers stated that his family were living at 301, Everleigh Road Battersea. His wife was Rose Florence Hyatt and they had been married on 31 May 1898. They had two children. Frederick Harold born on 1 October 1910 at Gates New York and Lilian Edna born on 17 August 1913 at Rochester New York.

Military Service

George was posted to the 6th Battalion H company. His conduct was “good” but he was discharged on 4 February 1916, described as “not likely to become an efficient soldier on medical grounds“.

His Pension Record shows that he was examined by Medical Boards in 1917 and 1919. He suffered from various conditions brought on by nephritis (inflammation of the kidneys) and syphilis. The dates in the Record are confusing. They appear to state that he was sent to Epsom, where he was declared insane on 6 May 1919 and died on 15 October 1919.

On 3 May 1919 George Hyatt, born 1878, was admitted to the Fulham Road Workhouse.

On 12 May 1919 George Hyatt, described as a bricklayer, was discharged from the Workhouse to Long Grove Asylum.

He died at age 42 in Long Grove Asylum and was buried in Horton Cemetery on 20 October 1919 (reference Epsom December 1919 quarter 2a 42).

Other Family Members

George’s mother Emma died aged 78 in the September quarter of 1926 (reference Willesden 3a 240).

George’s father John died aged 82 in the June quarter of 1928 (reference Willesden 3a 284).

In the December quarter of 1936 Lillian E. Hyatt married Gerald S. Baxter, (reference Faringdon Berkshire).

The Emma Jane Nicholson Family Tree states that:

George’s wife Rose died in September 1952 age 74 in Wantage, Berkshire.
His daughter Lilian died in July 1988 age 75 at Swindon, Wiltshire.
His son Frederick died in March 1994 age 84 in Sunderland, Durham.


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